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The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid. - Jane Austen

Review: Markus Zusak – The Book Thief

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20140227-085013.jpgI honestly had no idea what to expect from this book, I only really bought it because I saw a poster for the film and I thought that if I was going to see the film, I’d rather read the book first.

What I didn’t expect was a book which would take me on a journey leading to me sitting at my desk on my lunch break reading the final few chapters and trying not to cry (and failing miserably).

I’m not going to talk about the plot, because there’s a lot that happens and I wouldn’t want to spoil it for you if you want to read this book (and you really, really should).

The book was quite unusual, in that it was narrated by death. When I read this on the blurb, I thought it might be strange, and it was at first, but then it made perfect sense. I loved the main character Liesel and how we see the war through her childlike innocence, with that innocence slowly being eroded away as the war encroaches on her world and becomes more personal to her. The relationships between Liesel and Max, Liesel and Rudy, and Liesel and her Papa were precious, and the way that Zusak developed them through the story was genius.

I loved how ‘death’ kept giving you glimpses throughout the book as to what was coming at the end, seemingly to soften the blow. Not soft enough though. Obviously with the book being set in the war, you know there’s most likely going to be some horrific things happening. But because the novel is so well written, you feel like you are along for the journey with Liesel, and every heartache that she feels, you feel too.

I can’t really say any more without turning into a gushing idiot, I absolutely loved this book and I can’t really say anything else but that. If you’ve already read the book, you probably know what I’m saying, and if you haven’t read it, get out there and do it. Right now. You won’t regret it.

5/5