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The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid. - Jane Austen

Now Reading: David Nicholls – One Day

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First of all, it seems like forever since I started reading the last book, because I haven’t had much time for reading the last few weeks. But even though it’s taken me a while, I loved the book. I always expect auto-biographies to be a bit fake and fluffy, but David Wells definitely wasn’t pulling any punches. Brutally honest about himself, but also about anyone else he didn’t like (I think the Blue Jays took the brunt of most of it). I was surprised that he wrote the book while he was still playing, there was a lot of the book that I would have thought could make him pretty unpopular in the club house. Regardless, I learnt a lot about him from reading the book, and he seems like a genuinely nice guy – I think I had the wrong picture of him before I started reading.

My next book is one that is coming out in the cinema really soon. I saw the trailer for it when I saw Bridesmaids (funniest film of the year), and it looked like a great film (Anne Hathaway and Jim Sturgess). The trailer for the film said that it was based on a best-selling book, and I always like to read the book before I watch the film (mostly because the films never live up to the book, so I prefer to get the true story first), so when I saw the book at Asda on the 3 for £10 offer, I couldn’t really resist!

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Now Reading: David Wells – Perfect I’m Not

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The autobiography of Joe Torre that I just read was fantastic! I was quite lucky that I had a train journey to London and back on Friday, so I read the entire book in one day. The first part of the book was about his life – his upbringing and the start of his career (his playing days). I didn’t know too much about him before I started reading, but I was interested to learn he had quite a tough childhood, that he almost didn’t get to play baseball, and that he had an older brother (Frank), who was also a baseball player.

The second part of the book was about his managing career. I had only associated him with the Yankees, so it was quite surprising that he managed for a long time before the Yankees (and not very successfully either). The Yankees must have been the right fit for him, as the last part of the book was an in depth description of the 1996 World Series. It was fascinating to get inside the mind of a manager as he makes all the decisions, like when to take a player out of the game, and when to let them try and rescue themselves. It was highlighted because Joe Torre was previously a national league manager, and gave us descriptions of that mindset.

I’ve definitely got a different opinion of Joe Torre (and to some extent the Yankees), after reading this book, and it will definitely be one I read again.

The next book is another of the baseball books I just bought from Amazon. I didn’t realise that Amazon had some ‘Preferred Partners’. Basically this means that you buy a used book from another company, but it gets dispatched by Amazon, from the Amazon warehouse, and is still eligible for free shipping. It means you can gets books for £1-2 instead of £7-15. The condition is stated up front, and was pretty accurate when the books came. I’m the kind of person that likes to enjoy reading (as you may have noticed), so I don’t worry about keeping books in immaculate condition anyway.

I’ve heard some stories about David Wells, so I’m interested to see if his reputation is true!

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