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The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid. - Jane Austen

Review: Veronica Roth – Four (A Divergent Collection)

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WP_20140917_003I first spied this book just after it came out, but when I saw the price, I thought I’d leave it for my Christmas list, I didn’t really want to pay £9 for a book of short stories. But then I was having a pretty bad day and my lovely boyfriend brought it home for me, so I was very happy!

I didn’t really know what to expect from the collection, I knew it was four short stories written from the perspective of Tobias, but that was about it. I saw quite a few reviews on Goodreads that said it was a bit boring as there was a lot of repetition between the shorts and the main series, but I loved seeing how it all happened from a different perspective. It definitely changed my opinion of Tobias a little bit, especially the last story which was set around Tris’ initiation. In the main series, we see him as being a little on the mean side, but from his perspective we can see why he needed to do this and how much it killed him to have to do it.

After the main set of four short stories, there were also three even shorter stories, which were extremely short and sweet, but lovely all the same. I’m not going to hide the fact that I’m a huge fan of this series, and I thought these extra stories were brilliant, a perfect way of fleshing out some of the details which were missing from the main series.

I’d kinda like it if there were more stories from the perspective of some of the other characters, like Eric and Al. We’re not supposed to like these characters so it would be nice to see what was going through their heads too.

If you loved Roth’s style of writing in the main series and you loved the characters and you’re just hungry for more Tris and Tobias, you’ll love this book!

5/5

Review: Veronica Roth – Divergent

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Veronica Roth - DivergentI had high hopes for this book after hearing a lot of positive reviews and I’m happy to say I wasn’t disappointed. It had a lot to live up to after being mentioned many times as the next Hunger Games, a series which I absolutely loved, but I think if it’s possible, I may love this one more.

The main premise of the book is a future world split into five factions: Abnegation; the selfless, Candor; the truthful, Erudite; the knowledgable, Amity; the kind, and Dauntless; the brave. As a child, you grow up in the same faction as your parents, but at age sixteen, you get to choose which faction will be your place for the rest of your life, possibly leaving your family behind forever. Before you make this choice, you take an aptitude test which tells you which faction is most suited for you, but when Beatrice takes this test, she somehow manages to break the simulation. The woman administering her test tells Beatrice that she is Divergent, not fitting to any of the factions, and that she should never ever tell anyone.

I don’t want to go any further into the plot, because I don’t want to spoil this for any of you who may want to read it yourself, and I really would recommend that you do. But the book follows Beatrice to her newly chosen faction and through the initiation process, with it being imperative that she passes so that she doesn’t end factionless.

The book didn’t pull any punches, leaving nothing out in describing the fear that Beatrice is feeling every step of the way. We get to see her learning the ways of her new faction, while trying not to miss her family, and wondering what it means to be divergent. I felt every bit of fear and uncertainty that Beatrice was feeling, I felt so connected to the character that there were times when it was all I could do not to cry out at what I was reading.

The book sets up very nicely for book number two, Insurgent. I made a special trip to WH Smiths yesterday to buy it, I couldn’t wait for it to be delivered from Amazon, I need to read it now, like right now.

I’ll leave you with my favourite quote from the book, it really stood out to me:

“I believe in ordinary acts of bravery, in the courage that drives one person to stand up for another.”

5/5